Make bookmarks itself

Create bookmarks from real papyrus

Create your own bookmarks for school or a birthday. Various bookmarks made of real papyrus with ancient motifs for big and small. The Roman, Egyptian and Greek bookmarks can all be coloured and painted - with conventional paints and pens.


Designing bookmarks Gladiators - Heroes of the Arena

For example, there is the Roman bookmark with the image of a Roman gladiator. And not just any gladiator, but a real Murmillo! These were very heavily armed gladiators, so that the pupils can also learn at the same time what belonged to the equipment of such a hero of antiquity; for example, the straight-bladed short sword, the so-called gladius, as well as a scutum, the gladiators' protective shield, or a manica, a hand guard. Incidentally, his name derives from murma, a sea fish caught in a net. The murmillo gladiator was in fact used in Roman gladiatorial combat primarily against an opponent armed with a net: the most common gladiator called Retarius. There are many genera among gladiators, which pupils will certainly find very exciting to explore and differentiate on the basis of their diverse equipment. After all, gladiators in ancient Rome were something like today's super stars!

Designing bookmarks | Roman architecture

Among the many other exciting bookmarks made of real papyrus on these pages of the Roman Shop, you can also discover the different types of columns that Romans used for their buildings. This is how easy and entertaining it can be to teach pupils what a Corinthian column looks like. Knowledge that will certainly not be lost once learned!

Designing a bookmark | Gods of the Romans

The bookmark with the image of the god Mercury invites you into the world of the ancient gods. The Romans had about twelve "old gods" and another twelve "new" main gods, which they took over from the Greek world of gods. This is exciting history pure and simple, because all these Roman gods not only had their functions in the everyday life of the Romans, they also wove legendary stories and myths that are worth exploring. So when Mercury is coloured on the real papyrus, pupils can learn about the Roman god Mercurius, that his name goes back to the word Ware (merx in Latin). Mercury is considered the messenger of the gods, the god of merchants and thieves, and thus has the same status as the Greek god Hermes, whose name is used by a well-known German parcel service for this reason.

Bookmark Egypt | Pharaonic Colouring Templates

On these pages of the Roman shop Teaching material Egypt, various bookmarks made of real papyrus take you into the world of ancient Egypt. The Egypt bookmarks can be coloured and painted by the pupils - also with conventional paints and pens, watercolours or tempera, which you will also find under this category of the Roman Shop.

Painting the eye of Horus on the Egypt bookmark yourself

The Egyptian eye of Horus is also available as a wonderful bookmark Egypt made of real premium papyrus on the pages Teaching material Egypt on the pages of the Roman shop. The Eye of Horus, also called the Udjat Eye (udjat for intact, complete, whole, healthy) or Udzat Eye, is incidentally an ancient Egyptian symbol of the god of light Horus. It is also an Egyptian hieroglyph that carried magical significance and was even used in mathematics. The Horus Eye is the restored left eye ("moon eye") of the god of light Horus, healed by Thot.

Originally, the symbol served for protection and was used from the beginning of the Old Kingdom until the end of the Pharaonic period as an amulet and protective sign against the "evil eye". In the New Kingdom, coffin walls and grave goods were decorated with it - it is also considered the "magic eye" and has gained a great deal of recognition. It was also used in mathematics by the ancient Egyptians. The so-called stem fractions (1/x) and those of the powers of two 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 were written as elements of the eye of Horus. And historically interesting in this context, certainly for the mathematicians among the clever students: the sum of the fractions is said to have been made to disappear by the god Thot! In medicine, the Eye of Horus was used as an amulet and perhaps also as a healing spell.

Bookmarks Egypt inspire history(s)!

Let the other bookmarks such as the god Thot (mentioned above) or Osiris and Horus under the category Bookmarks Egypt inspire you to a creative lesson in which the students experience history in a completely different way! Knowledge that, learned this way, will certainly never be lost again!

Design your own gods as bookmarks!

The Egypt bookmarks made of real papyrus offer as a painting template, for example, the Egyptian god Anubis, who, as a deity with the head of a jackal, is responsible for embalming the dead. Translated, the name of the ancient god means: "He who is in the bandages of the mummy." The typical attribute of the god Anubis is the jackal or a man with the head of a jackal. The bookmarks made of real papyrus can be painted with all common colours, such as acrylic or watercolours. However, tempera paints are particularly recommended because they have a very good covering colour strength and also because they were already used by the Romans and Egyptians. In this way, the pupils can make a bookmark as was customary in the long-gone days of Egyptian culture.

Make your own medieval bookmark

On these pages of the Roman shop Teaching material Middle Ages you will find various bookmarks made of real papyrus.

The ancient bookmarks can be coloured and painted by the pupils - also with conventional paints and pens, watercolours or tempera, which you will also find under this category of the Roman Shop.

Medieval writings

Let the pupils write on the papyrus bookmarks with a pen! This way, the pupils can try out what it was once like. This is vivid teaching, is fun and the bookmark marks in the textbook where the tasks are to be solved. With the writing tube made of real reed, the pupils can also beautifully write medieval letters in calligraphic script on the bookmark. There are many templates for this. And Johann Friedrich Unger wrote in 1793 about a possible abolition of the Fraktur script: "Why should we Germans renounce originality in this? To please the foreigners who want to learn our language? Did any nation do this to make things easier for us? - For an adult, learning to write is the work of a few hours, or at least is out of the question. Anyone who is serious about learning the German language will certainly not be deterred by an effort so little increased."

Writing with the pen

The writing instrument of the Middle Ages was the goose quill. A goose feather (or other quill) was cut to size, and the feathering was often removed. Goose feathers, by the way, were still the most commonly used writing tool until about 200 years ago. For writing, the nib was cut as a ribbon nib, i.e. the nib was broad so that it could produce broad and thin strokes. For illustrations, the nib was cut as a pointed nib. And nibs could also be hardened by sticking them in hot sand. In the Middle Ages, brushes made of marten and squirrel hair were used for book painting. And the pupils can try out what it's like to write with a quill on real papyrus or parchment! And they can make the ink themselves. It is interesting to note here: In the Middle Ages, soot ink was the main ink used. This was made from soot, ox bile, egg white and water. The soot provides the colouring, the ox gall ensures that the soot can be mixed with the liquid, the egg white ensures that the ink sticks to the writing surface and the water is used to dilute the ink to a consistency suitable for writing.

Designing bookmarks

Of course, bookmarks made of real papyrus can also be painted with all common colours, such as acrylic or watercolours. However, tempera paints are particularly recommended because they have a very good covering colour strength and also because they were already used by the Romans and Egyptians. In this way, the pupils can make a bookmark for themselves, as was customary in days long gone.


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